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From Value One, Spring 2011 No. 32
Metal One Corporation (Taiwan) Ltd.

Working Together with Kaohsiung Branch

The Taipei Office currently has 24 full-time employees—21 national staff and three Japanese representatives—and handles various kinds of transactions, primarily imports and exports, including domestic sales, working together with the Kaohsiung Branch located in the southern part of Taiwan. In January of this year, Taiwanese staff from the Taipei Office and Kaohsiung Branch gave group presentations under the theme "Future Vision of Metal One Taiwan in 2013." All the staff members carefully reviewed how to go about building their business in the steel industry in Taiwan, which has become an industrially mature country, and actively offered proposals regarding the actions Metal One Taiwan needs to take from here on out. Bearing these proposals in mind, Metal One Taiwan will strive for growth amid global competition and continue to move forward from here on out.

Taiwanese Economy's Increasing Ties with Mainland China

Taiwan has historically had strong ties with Japan. For many years, Taiwan has been a leading importer of goods from Japan. In recent years, however, it has been impossible to talk about Taiwan's economy without mentioning mainland China. China and Hong Kong are the number one destination for Taiwanese exports, accounting for just over 40% of all the countries to which Taiwan exports. Also, more than 80,000 Taiwanese firms have set up in China, and it was noteworthy that seven Taiwanese companies were in the top 10 of China's 2009 corporate export volume rankings, including the top two. China has become indispensable to Taiwanese firms as an export market and location for factories.

TAIPEI 101, the world's second tallest skyscraper

From Agricultural Products to Electronic Devices

In 1911, the Xinhai Revolution broke out on mainland China and was followed by the establishment of the Republic of China. In 1949, the Kuomintang government, led by Chiang Kai-shek, lost the civil war and moved from Nanjing to Taiwan, where it remains. Pineapples and other agricultural products were Taiwan's main industry at the time and accounted for approximately 80% of the country's export volume. Now, however, the electronic equipment industry—mainly the manufacturing of IT products and electronic components under contract—predominates. Taiwanese manufacturers produce and supply a high share of the world's personal computers, smartphones, iPads, and other IT equipment.

Taipei Sightseeing

Taipei, where the Taipei Office is located, is a city with a population of some 2.64 million people and serves a core economic and political role as Taiwan's capital. Among Taipei's tourist attractions is the famous National Palace Museum, which is counted among the four great museums of the world. It has so many displays overflowing with numerous ancient artworks transported from mainland China that you cannot see everything in just one day if you take your time. Furthermore, TAIPEI 101, which opened at the end of 2004, is currently the world's second tallest skyscraper and has now become a recognized Taipei landmark. Since the inauguration of direct flights between China and Taiwan in 2008, the number of Chinese tourists has increased rapidly. There are now 370 round-trip flights weekly to 33 Chinese cities. Access to Taipei from Japan became even more convenient with the start of flights between Haneda and Songshan last year.

National Palace Museum, one of world's four great museums

Famously Epicurean Taiwan

Taiwan is famous as a land of gourmets. Chiang Kai-shek, who was a gourmet, was said to have brought all his talented cooks with him from mainland China. You can dine on extremely delicious cuisine from throughout China for reasonable prices. DinTaiFung, which specializes in xialongbao (steamed buns) and is quite popular in Japan and the rest of Asia, has its main office and branch in Taipei. Waits of 30 minutes to an hour are the rule because the restaurants are always full (although some shops have recently begun to accept reservations). Lightly seasoned traditional Taiwanese cuisine suits the Japanese palate, and other dishes, such as beef noodle soup, oyster omelettes, stinky (!) tofu, and tropical fruit, all well known to both the Taiwanese people and tourists, can be found at evening street markets.

DinTaiFung's xialongbao; one-hour waits are the norm at this very popular eatery.

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